South East has the highest rate of fatal road crashes according to report

Fatal and serious crashes on the European Road Assessment Program (EuroRAP) network cost the economy in the South East £2 billion between 2013-15.

A report called Cutting the Cost of Dangerous Roads by the Road Safety Foundation has found that you’re more likely to be involved in a serious or fatal crash if you’re travelling on roads in the South East, compared to anywhere else in the UK. It found that between 2013-15 the South East had 30.9 fatal and serious crashes per billion vehicle kilometres travelled.


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The safest region has been named as the West Midlands which had nearly half the fatal and serous crashes as the South East with 18.5 per billion vehicle kilometres travelled.

South East’s high risk roads

Six of the UK’s top 10 higher risk roads are in the South East

  • A254 from junction with A28 in Margate to junction with A255 near Ramsgate
  • A259 from junction with A2036 at Glyne Gap to just outside Ore
  • A32 from M27 J10 to Delme Roundabout; Quay St roundabout to the Gosport ferry terminal
  • A3055 from junction with A3054 in Freshwater to junction with A3054 in Ryde
  • A21 from junction with A2100 to junction with A259 at Hastings
  • A4 from junction with Huntercombe Spur to junction 5 of M4
Via: Road Safety Foundation: Cutting the Cost of Dangerous Roads

Most improved South East road

The A3100 from A3 at Milford to Sandy Lane in Guildford which is 9.6km long has been named as the most improved road in the South East. Between 2010-12 there were 11 fatal and serous crashes on the dangerous stretch of road. This was reduced to just three between 2013-15.

Costs of dangerous roads in the South East

The South East has 1,245km of unacceptable higher risk roads, which are not being improved with the Department for Transports safer roads fund. Fatal and serous crashes on these roads cost the economy £552 million between 2013-15.

There are also 258km of persistently higher risk roads in the South East which aren’t being addressed by the safer roads fund. Fatal and serous crashes on these roads cost the economy £115 million between 2013-15.


All information and research in this article originated in the Road Safety Foundation: Cutting the Cost of Dangerous Roads report.


 

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